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The Hugo Project: 1978 – Gateway

Previously on the Hugo ProjectSome thoughts on thinking

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you.  This week we take off into space again, aiming for the inner Solar System and the Gateway station left behind by the mysterious Heechee. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

Gateway

Frederik Pohl
serialized in Galaxy in 1977

published in 1977

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Nobody knows who the Heechee were, what they were like, or why they left. But they did leave a lot behind, including the artificial habitat known as Gateway, from which their abandoned ships may travel to unknown locations apparently of interest to the disappeared aliens. Most of these missions end in failure, but the lure of Heechee artifacts and technology – maybe even an encounter with the Heechee themselves – keeps prospectors gambling with their lives and their sanity on the chance of striking lucky. Robinette Broadhead was one of the lucky ones – maybe…

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Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

Sometimes I think white dudes should just be banned from writing their own novels.

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Posted by on 14.4.2014 in Books

 

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FO: Midnight Traveler

Project Page: Midnight Traveler
Pattern: Traveler by Janel Laidman (from The Enchanted Sole)
Yarn: Kangaroo Dyer Franklin Hand Dyed in Midnight
Made for: J’s Birthday

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Posted by on 4.4.2014 in Knitting

 

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The Hugo Project: 1977 – Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang

Previously on the Hugo Projectaccessing alienation via relativity.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you. Kindly restrain expressions of individuality at our next stop; the clones find it unsettling. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang

Kate Wilhelm
published in 1975

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Environmental problems caused by pollution and nuclear fallout threaten humanity with sterilization and extinction. A small group manages to survive, hoarding resources in a secluded valley and cloning themselves to assure the survival of the species. The human species dies out, but the clones survive, creating their own culture and their own seemingly idyllic society. But resources, including technical equipment vital to clone growth and production, are running low, and some must be sent out of the valley to salvage what they can from the ruined cities. The first expedition returns with something far more dangerous – individuality…

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Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

Don’t look now, but it’s another female author! TWO whole women out of nineteen authors thus far! THREE books out of twenty-four! And we haven’t even made it to the 80s!

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Posted by on 31.3.2014 in Books

 

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FO: Read out Loud

Project Page: Read out Loud
Pattern: Chubby Chirps by Rebecca Danger
Yarn: Jo-Ann Sensations Angel Glitz, plus scraps from the never-ending bin of acrylic yarn
Made for: Monona Library Summer Reading Program

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Posted by on 28.3.2014 in Knitting

 

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THP Supplemental: Forever Free

The Forever War has two sequels, ish. The thematic sequel, Forever Peace, was published in 1997, and won the 1998 Hugo…so we’ll get to that in a few decades. Meanwhile, the second sequel is called Forever Free, and did not win a Hugo, so we’re tackling it now – just as well, since it’s the direct sequel to TFW. If you’re not confused yet, you clearly haven’t been paying attention. The Hugo Project continues…

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Forever Free

Joe Haldeman
published in 1999

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Warning! Spoilers ahead!

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Posted by on 17.3.2014 in Books

 

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The Hugo Project: 1976 – The Forever War

Previously on the Hugo ProjectAmbiguous Anarchy.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you. This week we take a journey of a thousand years, or perhaps only ten, objective, as the human race fights in a relativistic furball with the mysterious alien Taurans. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

The Forever War

Joe Haldeman
published in 1975

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At the end of the 20th century, physics teacher William Mandella is drafted to be part of an elite fighting force battling the first extraterrestrial life encountered by the human race – the Taurans. While William spends his youth traveling at relativistic velocities between engagements with the enemy, the human civilization he leaves behind advances centuries. The Taurans might be strange and alien – but from William’s perspective, the rest of human kind is becoming increasingly alien as well…

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Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

I don’t read a lot of military SF; aside from the lovably campy Lensmen series and the first two Honor Harrington novels, Starship Troopers was my only real exposure prior to this. It’s hard for me to say, then, whether the parallels (and anti-parallels, so to speak) between The Forever War and Starship Troopers are deliberate, or simply reflections of the genre.

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Posted by on 10.3.2014 in Books

 

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FO: Bifrost

Project Page: Bifrost
Pattern: Hitchhiker by Martina Behm
Yarn: Three Irish Girls Springvale Sock in Bromance
Made for: Winter Holiday of Mitu‘s Choice, 2013

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Posted by on 28.2.2014 in Knitting

 

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The Hugo Project: 1975 – The Dispossessed

Previously on the Hugo ProjectBig Dumb Object the Second.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you.  This week we explore the dual planets of Urras and Anarres in Ursula K Le Guin’s second Hugo-winner. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!


The Dispossessed

Ursula K Le Guin
published in 1974

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The twin worlds of Urras and Anarres could not be more different – one, a fertile planet teeming with life, dominated by the capitalist nation A-Io; the other, a desert world on which a society of anarchists scrape out their existence in seeming harmony. Each planet looms large in the skies of the other, but there has been virtually no communication between the two in centuries. Until a frustrated temporal physicist from Anarres crosses boundaries of space and ideology in his quest for a grand temporal theory, and maybe – just maybe – a real utopia…

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Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

Another stealth novel from Le Guin. I wish I hadn’t gotten so behind on my reading – I’d like some more time to let the ideas integrate into my brain before writing this review. As it is, I’ve mostly got a lot of “Hey! I remember that from Religion 202/Modern European History/etc!” – the detritus of a liberal arts education. Anyway, I’ll do the best I can.

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Posted by on 24.2.2014 in Books

 

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Self promotion: threat or menace?

No THP today – student teaching is eating into my reading time, so thoughts on The Dispossessed will be up next week. In the meantime, here’s a short but thought-provoking read about the lack of recognition for non-white!male authors in SF&F, specifically the Hugos.

 
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Posted by on 17.2.2014 in Life

 

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THP Supplemental: The Rama Sequilogy

In spite of Clarke’s insistence that he never intended for there to be anything more to the story from Rendezvous with Rama, more there is. So much more. I’ve made it through the trilogy of sequels Clarke penned with Gentry Lee, so that’s our topic for this week’s supplemental edition of The Hugo Project.

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Rama II
The Garden of Rama

Rama Revealed

Arthur C. Clarke and Gentry Lee
published in 1989, 1991, and 1993

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Warning! Spoilers ahead!

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