RSS

Tag Archives: Hugo Award for Best Novel

The Hugo Project: 1982 – Downbelow Station

Previously (lo, those many moons ago!) on the Hugo ProjectLovely ladies and wonderful worldbuilding

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you. After a 13-month haitus as I prepped for, some how survived, and then recovered from my first year teaching, THP is back in action with a visit to Pell’s World and its accompanying station. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

Downbelow Station

C. J. Cherryh
published in 1981

—–

Orbiting one of the few habitable worlds discovered by humankind, Pell Station – better known as Downbelow – rests uneasily at the boundary between Earth Company space and Union Alliance space. As war between the two factions heats up, Pell and its in habitants, human and Hisa, find themselves caught in the crossfire.

—–

Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

The Hugo Project makes its triumphant return!

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements
 
1 Comment

Posted by on 3.8.2015 in Books

 

Tags: , , , ,

The Hugo Project: 1981 – The Snow Queen

Previously on the Hugo ProjectUnderwhelming.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you.  This week we journey through the Black Gate to visit the planet of Tiamat. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

The Snow Queen

Joan D. Vinge
published in 1980

—–

The planet Tiamat’s unusual orbit is bringing it closer to the 100-year-long summer, and the end of the 150-year-long winter. At the time of this change, all offworlders will leave the planet, taking their technology with them, and the Snow Queen Arianrhod must give up her throne. The slaughter of the mer for their anti-agapic blood will cease and the Summer people will rule as the planet slides back into technological ignorance. But Arianrhod has a plan…a clone

—–

Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

My best friend has a very particular way of saying “interesting” when she’s not quite sure what to make of something. So I say unto you: innnnnnteresting.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
1 Comment

Posted by on 9.6.2014 in Books

 

Tags: , , , ,

The Hugo Project: 1980 – The Fountains of Paradise

Previously on the Hugo ProjectA beautiful little book.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you.  I hope you’re all up for a bit of mountain climbing as we trek to the best Earthly location for a space elevator this week. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

The Fountains of Paradise

Arthur C. Clarke
published in 1979

—–

Dr. Vannevar Morgan is the world’s greatest bridge builder. Having spanned the Strait of Gibralter, he sets his eye on an even larger bridge: one between the heavens and the Earth. The problem? The only gravitationally stable place on the planet to which he might anchor his bridge is the site of a sacred monastery in the equatorial country of Taprobane. Not to mention the fact that most people find the idea of a space elevator completely insane. But Morgan is determined to see his greatest bridge built.

—–

Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

I…don’t get it.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on 26.5.2014 in Books

 

Tags: , , , ,

The Hugo Project: 1979 – Dreamsnake

Previously on the Hugo ProjectI hate you but the science is cool.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you. This week we get back on track with our third lady author. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

Dreamsnake

Vonda McIntyre
published in 1978

—–

Snake is a healer, one of the few that has knowledge of genetics and medicine in a world that has slowly rebuilt itself after nuclear devastation. They work with a trio of serpents, a cobra, a rattlesnake, and a precious dreamsnake, to cure the ill and give comfort to the dying. But the number of healers grows fewer every year as they struggle to clone or mate enough dreamsnakes. When Snake’s own dreamsnake is killed by a fearful patient, she undertakes a journey to find another, and finds much more than she seeks…

—–

Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

Thank the gods for women writers. After wrestling with Pohl for the past month, Dreamsnake was exactly what I needed.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on 12.5.2014 in Books

 

Tags: , , , ,

The Hugo Project: 1978 – Gateway

Previously on the Hugo ProjectSome thoughts on thinking

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you.  This week we take off into space again, aiming for the inner Solar System and the Gateway station left behind by the mysterious Heechee. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

Gateway

Frederik Pohl
serialized in Galaxy in 1977

published in 1977

—–

Nobody knows who the Heechee were, what they were like, or why they left. But they did leave a lot behind, including the artificial habitat known as Gateway, from which their abandoned ships may travel to unknown locations apparently of interest to the disappeared aliens. Most of these missions end in failure, but the lure of Heechee artifacts and technology – maybe even an encounter with the Heechee themselves – keeps prospectors gambling with their lives and their sanity on the chance of striking lucky. Robinette Broadhead was one of the lucky ones – maybe…

—–

Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

Sometimes I think white dudes should just be banned from writing their own novels.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
2 Comments

Posted by on 14.4.2014 in Books

 

Tags: , , , ,

The Hugo Project: 1977 – Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang

Previously on the Hugo Projectaccessing alienation via relativity.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you. Kindly restrain expressions of individuality at our next stop; the clones find it unsettling. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang

Kate Wilhelm
published in 1975

—–

Environmental problems caused by pollution and nuclear fallout threaten humanity with sterilization and extinction. A small group manages to survive, hoarding resources in a secluded valley and cloning themselves to assure the survival of the species. The human species dies out, but the clones survive, creating their own culture and their own seemingly idyllic society. But resources, including technical equipment vital to clone growth and production, are running low, and some must be sent out of the valley to salvage what they can from the ruined cities. The first expedition returns with something far more dangerous – individuality…

—–

Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

Don’t look now, but it’s another female author! TWO whole women out of nineteen authors thus far! THREE books out of twenty-four! And we haven’t even made it to the 80s!

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on 31.3.2014 in Books

 

Tags: , , , ,

The Hugo Project: 1976 – The Forever War

Previously on the Hugo ProjectAmbiguous Anarchy.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you. This week we take a journey of a thousand years, or perhaps only ten, objective, as the human race fights in a relativistic furball with the mysterious alien Taurans. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

The Forever War

Joe Haldeman
published in 1975

—–

At the end of the 20th century, physics teacher William Mandella is drafted to be part of an elite fighting force battling the first extraterrestrial life encountered by the human race – the Taurans. While William spends his youth traveling at relativistic velocities between engagements with the enemy, the human civilization he leaves behind advances centuries. The Taurans might be strange and alien – but from William’s perspective, the rest of human kind is becoming increasingly alien as well…

—–

Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

I don’t read a lot of military SF; aside from the lovably campy Lensmen series and the first two Honor Harrington novels, Starship Troopers was my only real exposure prior to this. It’s hard for me to say, then, whether the parallels (and anti-parallels, so to speak) between The Forever War and Starship Troopers are deliberate, or simply reflections of the genre.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
3 Comments

Posted by on 10.3.2014 in Books

 

Tags: , , , ,

The Hugo Project: 1975 – The Dispossessed

Previously on the Hugo ProjectBig Dumb Object the Second.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you.  This week we explore the dual planets of Urras and Anarres in Ursula K Le Guin’s second Hugo-winner. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!


The Dispossessed

Ursula K Le Guin
published in 1974

—–

The twin worlds of Urras and Anarres could not be more different – one, a fertile planet teeming with life, dominated by the capitalist nation A-Io; the other, a desert world on which a society of anarchists scrape out their existence in seeming harmony. Each planet looms large in the skies of the other, but there has been virtually no communication between the two in centuries. Until a frustrated temporal physicist from Anarres crosses boundaries of space and ideology in his quest for a grand temporal theory, and maybe – just maybe – a real utopia…

—–

Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

Another stealth novel from Le Guin. I wish I hadn’t gotten so behind on my reading – I’d like some more time to let the ideas integrate into my brain before writing this review. As it is, I’ve mostly got a lot of “Hey! I remember that from Religion 202/Modern European History/etc!” – the detritus of a liberal arts education. Anyway, I’ll do the best I can.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on 24.2.2014 in Books

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Link

Self promotion: threat or menace?

No THP today – student teaching is eating into my reading time, so thoughts on The Dispossessed will be up next week. In the meantime, here’s a short but thought-provoking read about the lack of recognition for non-white!male authors in SF&F, specifically the Hugos.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on 17.2.2014 in Life

 

Tags: , ,

The Hugo Project: 1974 – Rendezvous with Rama

Previously on the Hugo ProjectScience and gender and science, oh my!

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you.  Kindly ensure you have your certifications for low-G and one-G activities handy – you’ll need to do both as we rendezvous with our second Big Dumb Object of the ’70s, the mysterious spacecraft Rama. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

Rendezvous with Rama

Arthur C. Clarke
published in 1973

—–

In the 22nd century, space travel is common, and humans have mastered much of the Solar System. What they have not found, however, is evidence of anything resembling extraterrestrial life…until Rama. The mysterious cylindrical spacecraft drifts into the Solar System with no warning, sending no signals, providing no clue as to who built it or why they sent it. So the human race decides to explore…

—–

Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

This book is like a Volkswagen.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
3 Comments

Posted by on 3.2.2014 in Books

 

Tags: , , , ,