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Tag Archives: science fiction

THP Supplemental: The Foundation Trilogy

This is a THP first (though it shall soon be repeated) – a Hugo winner that is not the first book of its series. The 1983 Hugo Award for Best Novel went to Isaac Asimov’s Foundation’s Edge, the 4th (publication order) and/or 6th (internal chronology) in his Foundation series. So before we can get to the 30th official edition of The Hugo Project, we first have to read the original Foundation trilogy…

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Foundation
Foundation and Empire
Second Foundation

Isaac Asimov
stories published in Astounding Magazine, 1942 – 1950
published as novels in 1951, 1952, and 1953

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Warning! Spoilers ahead!

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Posted by on 14.9.2015 in Books

 

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THP Supplemental: After Downbelow

C. J. Cherryh is a prolific writer, and depending on how you count, has published anywhere from 6 to 26 other novels related to Downbelow Station, including another Hugo winner. Despite my mixed reaction to Downbelow, I soldiered through four more novels for this week’s edition of The Hugo Project.

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Merchanter’s Luck
Rimrunners
Tripoint
Finity’s End

C. J. Cherryh
published in 1982, 1989, 1994, and 1997

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Warning! Spoilers ahead!

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Posted by on 17.8.2015 in Books

 

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The Hugo Project: 1982 – Downbelow Station

Previously (lo, those many moons ago!) on the Hugo ProjectLovely ladies and wonderful worldbuilding

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you. After a 13-month haitus as I prepped for, some how survived, and then recovered from my first year teaching, THP is back in action with a visit to Pell’s World and its accompanying station. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

Downbelow Station

C. J. Cherryh
published in 1981

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Orbiting one of the few habitable worlds discovered by humankind, Pell Station – better known as Downbelow – rests uneasily at the boundary between Earth Company space and Union Alliance space. As war between the two factions heats up, Pell and its in habitants, human and Hisa, find themselves caught in the crossfire.

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Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

The Hugo Project makes its triumphant return!

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Posted by on 3.8.2015 in Books

 

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THP Supplemental: The Snow Queen Cycle

This extremely late edition of The Hugo Project is brought to you by various and sundry Adulthood endeavors, illnesses both physical and mental, and an extremely long book. But we’re back on track this week with the three additional books Vinge has written in her Snow Queen universe.

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World’s End
The Summer Queen
Tangled up in Blue

Joan D. Vinge
published in 1984, 1991 and 2000

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Warning! Spoilers ahead!

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Posted by on 30.6.2014 in Books

 

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The Hugo Project: 1981 – The Snow Queen

Previously on the Hugo ProjectUnderwhelming.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you.  This week we journey through the Black Gate to visit the planet of Tiamat. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

The Snow Queen

Joan D. Vinge
published in 1980

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The planet Tiamat’s unusual orbit is bringing it closer to the 100-year-long summer, and the end of the 150-year-long winter. At the time of this change, all offworlders will leave the planet, taking their technology with them, and the Snow Queen Arianrhod must give up her throne. The slaughter of the mer for their anti-agapic blood will cease and the Summer people will rule as the planet slides back into technological ignorance. But Arianrhod has a plan…a clone

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Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

My best friend has a very particular way of saying “interesting” when she’s not quite sure what to make of something. So I say unto you: innnnnnteresting.

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Posted by on 9.6.2014 in Books

 

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The Hugo Project: 1980 – The Fountains of Paradise

Previously on the Hugo ProjectA beautiful little book.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you.  I hope you’re all up for a bit of mountain climbing as we trek to the best Earthly location for a space elevator this week. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

The Fountains of Paradise

Arthur C. Clarke
published in 1979

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Dr. Vannevar Morgan is the world’s greatest bridge builder. Having spanned the Strait of Gibralter, he sets his eye on an even larger bridge: one between the heavens and the Earth. The problem? The only gravitationally stable place on the planet to which he might anchor his bridge is the site of a sacred monastery in the equatorial country of Taprobane. Not to mention the fact that most people find the idea of a space elevator completely insane. But Morgan is determined to see his greatest bridge built.

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Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

I…don’t get it.

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Posted by on 26.5.2014 in Books

 

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The Hugo Project: 1979 – Dreamsnake

Previously on the Hugo ProjectI hate you but the science is cool.

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you. This week we get back on track with our third lady author. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

Dreamsnake

Vonda McIntyre
published in 1978

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Snake is a healer, one of the few that has knowledge of genetics and medicine in a world that has slowly rebuilt itself after nuclear devastation. They work with a trio of serpents, a cobra, a rattlesnake, and a precious dreamsnake, to cure the ill and give comfort to the dying. But the number of healers grows fewer every year as they struggle to clone or mate enough dreamsnakes. When Snake’s own dreamsnake is killed by a fearful patient, she undertakes a journey to find another, and finds much more than she seeks…

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Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

Thank the gods for women writers. After wrestling with Pohl for the past month, Dreamsnake was exactly what I needed.

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Posted by on 12.5.2014 in Books

 

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THP Supplemental: The Gateway Trip Forever

Well, ducklings, I made it. I have now read all the Gatewaybooks in existence. Actually, these last two were much more enjoyable and much less rage-inducing than the sequilogy or the original. Let’s bring the Gateway edition of The Hugo Project home!

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The Gateway Trip
The Boy Who Would Live Forever

Frederik Pohl
published in 1990 and 2004

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Warning! Spoilers ahead!

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Posted by on 28.4.2014 in Books

 

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THP Supplemental: Further Adventures with the Heechee

Despite my ambivalent reaction to Gateway, I decided to continue on with it. Damned if Pohl didn’t make me curious! I made it through the next three books, which aren’t exactly a sequilogy but which I am going to call one since I don’t get enough excuses to use my made-up word. The Hugo Project continues…

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Beyond the Blue Event Horizon
Heechee Rendezvous
The Annals of the Heechee

Frederik Pohl
published in 1980, 1984, and 1987

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Warning! Spoilers ahead!

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Posted by on 21.4.2014 in Books

 

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The Hugo Project: 1978 – Gateway

Previously on the Hugo ProjectSome thoughts on thinking

I’ve decided I’m just crazy enough to try to read every book that’s ever won the Hugo Award for Best Novel…and, of course, that I want to share this insane experience with all of you.  This week we take off into space again, aiming for the inner Solar System and the Gateway station left behind by the mysterious Heechee. Sixty-odd posts of science fiction, speculation and social justice continue!

Gateway

Frederik Pohl
serialized in Galaxy in 1977

published in 1977

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Nobody knows who the Heechee were, what they were like, or why they left. But they did leave a lot behind, including the artificial habitat known as Gateway, from which their abandoned ships may travel to unknown locations apparently of interest to the disappeared aliens. Most of these missions end in failure, but the lure of Heechee artifacts and technology – maybe even an encounter with the Heechee themselves – keeps prospectors gambling with their lives and their sanity on the chance of striking lucky. Robinette Broadhead was one of the lucky ones – maybe…

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Warning! Mild spoilers ahead!

Sometimes I think white dudes should just be banned from writing their own novels.

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Posted by on 14.4.2014 in Books

 

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